World Egg Day: 5 interesting ways people cook their eggs around the world

0
58

Special desk: Eggs make for a quintessential item in almost every household across the world. One of the most versatile foods ever, be it on days you are pressed for time or days you want to whip up an elaborate meal for yourself, you can always bank on eggs to do the trick.

From Shakshuka to Scotch eggs, they can be cooked in a number of different ways, each with its unique style and taste. Not only do they serve the palate well, they are also very high in nutrition–packed with micronutrients, essential vitamins, good cholesterol, protein, and anti-oxidants. To top it all, they are also pocket-friendly.

Here’s a quick guide to the many interesting ways eggs are eaten around the world.

Shakshuka, Israel

Shakshuka, which forms a staple part of the Israeli diet, originated in the Middle East. Poached eggs stewed in tomato sauce spiced up with chilli peppers, onions, cumin, paprika, and cayenne pepper go into the dish. Shakshuka gets its name from the Arabic slang Shakshuka which means ‘a spicy mixture’.

Egg Hopper or Egg Appam, Sri Lanka

Egg hopper is bowl-shaped thin crispy pancake made from fermented rice flour and topped with an egg – basically, an egg is broken into appam while it is cooked on the tawa.

Scotch Egg, England

There are several theories around the origin of the dish. A department store in England Fortnum & Mason claims to have invented Scotch eggs in 1738 while its similarity with the Mughlai dish called, Nargisi Kofta have other stories to tell. Scotch eggs are basically hard-boiled eggs wrapped in meat and coated in breadcrumbs which are then baked or deep-fried and cut into halves to serve.

Century Egg, China

Century egg, also known as black egg or thousand year egg is a Chinese dish. Its origin can be traced back to 600 years in the Ming Dynasty where eggs were preserved in slaked lime to form a dark green or grey creamy product. Nowadays, several methods are used where eggs are preserved in clay, ash, salt, quicklime, and rice hulls.

Eggs en cocotte or Shirred eggs, France

Shirred egg gets its name from the traditional French flat bottom dish called shirrer which was used to bake the eggs centuries ago. This dish has also been compared with America’s popular breakfast recipe, Eggs Benedict, but is several times simpler in cooking as it requires only butter as an ingredient apart from the eggs. That saves us all from preparing a batch for hollandaise sauce for Eggs Benedict.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here